OUR commitment to reducing our waste

The human-created tragedy of the South Pacific Garbage Patch

The exact size of the Garbage Patch is hard to pin down because so few oceanographic cruises have crossed this area with an objective to systematically sample plastics. Also, ocean features are a moving target and the borders and content of the area constantly change with ocean currents and wind.

Regardless of how big it is or where it is located, it is clear that the Pacific Garbage Patch does not belong in our ocean and we need to learn more about this feature so that we can properly address it.

Source: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/facts/garbagepatch.html

Estimates of size range from 700,000 square kilometres (270,000 sq mi) (about the size of Texas) to more than 15,000,000 square kilometres (5,800,000 sq mi) (0.4% to 8% of the size of the Pacific Ocean), or, in some media reports, up to “twice the size of the continental United States”.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Pacific_garbage_patch

The human-created tragedy of the South Pacific Garbage Patch

The exact size of the Garbage Patch is hard to pin down because so few oceanographic cruises have crossed this area with an objective to systematically sample plastics. Also, ocean features are a moving target and the borders and content of the area constantly change with ocean currents and wind. Regardless of how big it is or where it is located, it is clear that the Pacific Garbage Patch does not belong in our ocean and we need to learn more about this feature so that we can properly address it.

Source: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/facts/garbagepatch.html

Estimates of size range from 700,000 square kilometres (270,000 sq mi) (about the size of Texas) to more than 15,000,000 square kilometres (5,800,000 sq mi) (0.4% to 8% of the size of the Pacific Ocean), or, in some media reports, up to “twice the size of the continental United States”.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Pacific_garbage_patch

As as a group of educators – CUE has a responsibility to lead.

A clear area in which we can lead is the plastic waste reduction.

CUE is actively working to minimize our plastic and one-time use items.

Lesson Plans

CUE is sharing member-created lesson plans to bring awareness to this looming (and unnecessary) eco-disaster.

Pandemonium in the Pacific

Paul WilliamsLesson Plan By:

Paul Williams

@mrwilliamssteam

Where Does Your Garbage Go?

Lisa HighfillLesson Plan By:

Lisa Highfill

@lhighfill

Single-use plastic is having a profoundly negative effect on sea life.

Albatross_chick_plastic

CUE is committed to reducing waste at our events…

and here’s where we are going to start:

Reduce – Reuse – Recycle

Event Bags

Beginning with Spring CUE 2018 will not be supplying event bags at our conferences. This will be a reduction of nearly 10,000 bags and a reduction in the associated shipping and packaging waste. Bring your bag to CUE just like you would at the grocery store!

Plastic/Swag

CUE will begin minimizing our purchases of “swag” items that are plastic-based and single-use items. MotherJones has some great data on this problem. http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2015/02/ocean-plastic-waste-china/

Less Plastic Bottles

We are setting a goal of decreasing our use of disposable bottles and increase the use of reusable water bottles at our events. This will take time, but the payoff will be worth the work.

Badge holders/Badges

CUE will begin using corn-based plastic or have collection points to properly recycle our clear plastic badge holders. Potentially 20,000 fewer pieces of oil-based plastic per year. We will use recycled paper for our printer badges.

Lanyards

We’ll begin using non-plastic lanyards at all events – this could mean over 10,000 fewer pieces of plastic per year.  (We’ll use cotton or corn-based lanyards going forward)

Digital OnCUE

We will be moving to an online-only option for the OnCUE Journal. This will be a significant reduction in paper, shipping and packaging waste.

Long format printed programs

We are moving to a one-page flyer and Sched
(the daily one-page flyer will be printed on recycled paper and printed with soy ink and will be 54 pages less waste than the current program).

Leadership

CUE is are open to your ideas to reduce waste at our events email Jon Corippo at jcorippo@cue.org

Other Worldwide Reduction Efforts

The Truth about our trash

8.3 BILLION

metric tons of plastic
produced to date

8.3 BILLION

metric tons of plastic
produced to date

%

Ends up in landfill or environment

%

Incinerated

%

Recycled

Source:  “Production, use, and fate of all plastics ever made,” Science Advances, 2017

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